Wave Without Warning

It was the day after Christmas 2004, beaches everywhere were flooded with tourists from around the world, especially those escaping the cold weather.

 

At 7:58 am, a 9.1 magnitude earthquake occurred with the epicentre of the west coast of northern Sumatra. Cities around were destroyed as tsunamis as high as 30 metres hit islands and villages destroying anything in its path. 14 different countries that couldn’t stop the disaster, and without any warnings the waves washed up everything. India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand etc.

 

Different parts of Thailand was hit multiple times, with time intervals of one and a half hours in between. Staying in a small uphill resort was Cameron Hunter and his family. Early morning on boxing day right after Christmas resulted in not as many people down at the beach. Mr. Hunter was on holiday with his wife and children aged three and one. He was on okay swimmer whereas his wife and kids weren’t as great. Scheduled to go windsurfing at 9:30, the guide never came. As he was waiting to go windsurfing, the tide receded rapidly far out into the ocean, being curious, he and his family followed the tide to find it frothing meters away from where it was just a few moments ago. It was greatly unusual to see white water at such a low tide as it continues to froth. His children were fascinated and played on the beach with no care in the world. But as the tide began to froth even more than it was doing moments ago, white water becoming more frequent. Then the tide swept everything up.

Pushing all those people who decided to go for a nice swim back up to shore. Tossing everyone in its wave, acting with instinct Mr. Hunter had to think fast and grab his kids who were luckily wearing arm floaties that they despised in the first place as all kids do. Struggling to swim with two kids under his arm he had to find his wife who he thought would be struggling. Seeing his wife being helped by the windsurfer guide that arrived not too late, he and his family ran onto the beach and deserted everything that they brought to save themselves and went up towards the resort. Encouraging his family to keep going to safe land and leaving the beach was instinct. The only thing on his mind was his family and nothing else. His instincts kicked in during a time of need which saved his family. Everyone at the resort watched below at the damage being done by waves. Everyone had no idea what was happening, everyone in shock not knowing what just happened. Tourists and locals together watched in confusion and shock as the waves kept coming and coming until the area was flooded and destroyed. Everyone that was at the resort and beach made it back to safety.

Imagine yourself in that situation. No warning or signs, but another day on holiday at the beach. Early start to boxing day but the tide recedes rapidly. Moments later being washed up in the waves, struggling as you’re in shock, but adrenaline and instincts kick in and you’re fighting for your life. But as mentioned earlier, Mr. Hunter only helped out his family while others at the beach were also caught in the wave. You could think it was a selfish act, just deserting those people. But when disaster strikes, you need to think fast and think between choosing family or strangers.

 

But now in 2019 you probably won’t find yourself in that situation. With advancements in technology we are able to predict when disaster will strike so, we should always be prepared no matter what. But it should always be important to appreciate everything that you have right now as anything can happen at the most unsuspecting time.

 

Be grateful for what you have.

 

 

 

https://www.history.com/news/deadliest-tsunami-2004-indian-ocean

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1280494/The-wall-water-waist-high-rising-Then-second-wave-hit–Carol-McGiffin-survived-2004-tsunami.html

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-24/boxing-day-tsunami-then-now-photos/5875900

 

 

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