2019 Gili Strong Triathlon

The 6th Sporting event to take place in Gili Trawangan, the Gili Strong Triathlon was a big success. The registration fees collected from 28 teams and 35 individuals amounted to 10.6 million rupiah, with all of it going towards the NGO. This is because the local government provided the prize money, and local businesses provided prizes. A raffle was also held, which raised another 12.8 million rupiah. Also, their pop-up eco market stall was at the Gili Festival (a 3-day event after the triathlon) and in total it made 3.7 million rupiah.

Gili Strong Triathlon participants jump into the water to start the swimming part of the race.
Participants starting the swimming part of the race (Image courtesy of Panca Nugraha)

This money will go towards purchasing 1 or 2 second-hand rubbish collection trucks for the island’s daily rubbish collection and renting an excavator to relocated rubbish off an access road to a dump on the island.

Here is the more detailed post on the NGO website:
https://giliecotrust.com/gili-triathlon-winners-all-round/

Initial Reflection and Moving Forward for 2019/2020

November 12th, 2019

It is now the 6th session of Gili Eco Trust in the 2019 – 2020 academic year, and a lot of the initial set-up has been completed. 

Our first session on the 10th of September involved a basic overview of both the GC and the NGO. The leaders summarized their aims and their methods. For example, they explained what biorock is, and why helping the Gili islands is so important. They also gave us the link to the Gili Eco Trust NGO website.

Planning Swimdonesia: (reflection on planning)

Right from the get-go, we organized an event called Swimdonesia with Surf Aid GC and Jakarta Street Kids GC to raise money for our respective GC. This was a big event in which various games were played in and around the pool, and the usual food and beverages were sold. Our ex-chair and ex-vice-chair (now chair) with our MCs for Swimdonesia


Kids of all ages can’t wait to try the Destroyer. 


The Destroyer, the blow-up obstacle course we organize every year for Swimdonesia

 

Aside from the first session, most of our time has been dedicated to Swimdonesia. Because it was on the 12th of October, we had very little time to get organized as a group before we had to rush to prepare for it. However, our leadership team and some members of our GC did attend some sessions concerning the logistics of the event, finalisation of ideas with all three GCs (Gili Eco Trust, Jakarta Street Kids and Surf Aid) and the final plan. 

 


Gili Eco Trust GC members working

 

In our second session, we split up into groups to work on various activities that would occur at the event, such as a quiz, games, and ticket-selling. However, a lot of the fun activities got cancelled. This is because we realised we didn’t have enough time to plan them properly, and we were told by Mr Hannah that we did not have enough people to plan the event. Indeed, many on our team couldn’t or didn’t go to Swimdonesia – but all of us helped in planning it. The challenges in organizing the event can be seen in more detail in our SWOT analysis post

 

However, the hurried planning for the event has helped us to practise prioritising tasks and quickly analyse the logistics of events we may hold. It will help us in organizing another of our events coming up, the Holiday Fair on the 12th of December.

 

Leadership Positions:

After finishing Swimdonesia planning, our chair and vice-chair have stepped down. Our new chair is Iman, and our vice-chairs are now Oscar and Arjun. Other leadership positions so far include: Head of finance (Aarnav), and Communications Officer (Ashima).

 

Goal Setting Document:

The ROLE Plastic Conference 2019

Last month, members of the Gili Eco Trust foundation travelled to Bali to join the ROLE Foundation’s 3rd annual conference and debate regarding the ‘Zero Waste to Ocean’ debate.  

Indonesia is the 2nd largest global contributor to plastic in our oceans. More than 250 people from various organizations and initiatives all over the world, including representatives of the Gili Eco Trust NGO, joined together in the Zero Waste to Oceans – Community Environment & Skills Center to discuss and learn more about who is responsible. Eight speakers from different associations in Bali spoke during the conference. 

Jane Fisher from IWP (Indonesia’s Waste Platform)  started off the debate with an important question, “Who is responsible?”  

 More often than not, plastic and packaging producers insist the blame is on the irresponsible consumer of their product whilst instead, they should be taking responsibility for the materials they produce. More than 500 companies in Bali alone are using single-use plastics that cannot currently be recycled, and one main reason recyclers won’t take on such single-use plastics is down to its extremely low recyclable value. 

To achieve Indonesia’s commitment to reducing plastic waste in the ocean by 30% by 2025, it is essential that the Government puts more pressure on these corporations and take legal actions accordingly. Using the term Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), industries should be taking responsibility for their products throughout their entire life-cycle.

Piet Van Zyl, from Positive Impact Forever, explained that it was difficult for the locals to make a connection between their waste (mis)management (throwing everything in rivers) and actual marine waste. He also stressed the fact that ‘zero waste’ doesn’t exist, everybody is making waste even if it’s only a little bit. Recycling is not the answer and there is no “magic bin” (social acceptance of disposing of your rubbish in a bin thinking that now it has been dealt with). He finished stating that “Reducing marine waste by 30% before 2025 is progress, however, it is not a final achievement”.

So how can we stay positive through all this chaos?

Dr. Surya Anaya (Komunitas Peduli Sampah Bali), Christian Fritz (ecoSmart hub) and Dwi Jayanthi (Plastic Detox) showed many single-use plastic alternatives that can be introduced daily, explaining that there are many different solutions to reduce the use of plastic: metal boxes for take-away, reusable bottles, alternatives to plastic straws etc. Raza Helmi from No Plastic Indonesia highlighted the influencing impact of social media to stop using disposable products. Things like metal straws, reusable cups and bags have started to become very popular amongst influencers all over the world, and thus affecting and improving the mindsets of teenagers and social media users across the globe. They all stress how easy it is to take small steps and make responsible choices to reduce the problem, especially with single-use plastic – even for those who are more reluctant and don’t want to lose their convenient consumer habits.

Following the conference, small debates were held amongst members to determine the roles of the government action over marine plastic waste along with stalls from environmental entrepreneurs and sustainable alternatives and solutions to the problem with plastic. The Gili Eco Trust had a popup eco market stall to show some of the campaigns we continue to work with on Gili Trawangan to forward motions towards a zero-waste-to-oceans approach.

To keep following the incredible work of ROLE Foundation check out the ROLE foundation’s official website.